How Can White People Help Black People. What is the Real Problem

Jay Miller

Jun 04, 2020 08:58 AM

The following is an excerpt from a personal conversation I had.

Not to be the Subject matter black guy or anything but a couple of years of research and several years of living has taught me this:

  1. Black communities are considered dangerous because of generalizations and scare tactics. Not every black neighborhood is the same depiction of South Central LA and most neighborhoods are so gentrified that black people can't afford to live in their communities anymore.
  2. There are extreme wage and education disparities between black and white families. Something to the tune of about $150,000.
  3. We can't blame "fathers not being in the homes". Black fathers are more likely to attend family functions and are likely to stay married longer than their white counterparts.
  4. White Americans don't know this, because the only glimpse of Black America is what they see on TV in the news or what they've been told for generations.

That's it.

My thought is if you can fix number 2. Then you can improve the these "Dangerous" communities and ultimately destroy the PR stunt that has been hurting black folks for the last couple hundred years

How Do You Fix Number 2?

Make education accessible (cheaper) or you make it less important.

As someone with over a decade of experience in the tech space. I was able to do that because someone gave me a chance and I proved them right.

My chance came from my experience in the Armed Forces. That is not something that all people of color will have.

I will put it clearly...

HIRE MORE PEOPLE OF COLOR AND PAY ALL PEOPLE BASED ON PROVEN EXPERIENCE, NOT EDUCATION.

It won't solve the problems tomorrow (That's for legislation and representation in our government to do.) But it will do something to reduce the wage gap in America. It will make our communities better and more affluent (and reduce crime).

"We can't pull ourselves up by our bootstraps if we can't afford boots." - Someone that at one point couldn't afford boots.